Feminism


Marlene Dietrich’s Re-Education of American Female Sensuality

This post was originally written for my MA Film and Literature course “Cold War Culture: Literature, Film, Theory in Cold War Europe” at the University of York (lecturer Dr. Erica Sheen).  The most poignant line Marlene Dietrich has in A Foreign Affair is when she asks her American army officer lover, […]


A Legacy of ‘Difficult Women’: from 18th century Britain to classic Hollywood

This weekend I had the privilege of attending the ‘Difficult Women: 1680-1830’ Conference hosted by the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies at the University of York. This was a two-day interdisciplinary event which included presentations from the fields of literature, history, history of art, costuming/history of fashion, theatre history, and women’s […]


Greta Garbo Faces Hypocrisy in a Man’s World in ANNA KARENINA (1935)

This post is written in conjunction with the Russia in Classic Film Blogathon, hosted by Movies, Silently and sponsored by Flicker Alley. Like DOCTOR ZHIVAGO (1965), ANNA KARENINA gives a cinematic snapshot of the opulent life of Imperial Russia. Although the earlier film is unable to employ the scenery of Russia’s vast landscape […]


7 Ways Katharine Hepburn Leans In in A WOMAN REBELS (1936)

The post is written in honour of International Women’s Day 2015. Scroll to the bottom for more information about how you can be part of the fight against sexism and gender inequality. A WOMAN REBELS (1936) is about a Pamela Thistlewaite (Katharine Hepburn), a young woman in Victorian England who must […]


THE TAMING OF THE SHREW (1967) is More Problem Play Than Comedy

William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew” is classed as a comedy in the First Folio, though the term “comedy” had a slightly different meaning in Shakespeare’s day than it does today. A comedy then was simply any play that concluded with a happy ending, usually a marriage or reconciliation […]


The Women of the London Detection Club of the 1930s: Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Company

Do you promise that your detectives shall well and truly detect the crimes presented to them, using those wits which it may please you to bestow upon them and not placing reliance on, nor making use of Divine Revelation, Feminine Intuition, Mumbo-Jumbo, Jiggery-Pokery, Coincidence or the Act of God? I […]


Why LITTLE WOMEN (1933) is a very big deal

“There’s one thing George and I agree on. Actually, we agree on almost everything. I don’t know anything we don’t agree on. One thing we really agree on is, we love LITTLE WOMEN. We loved doing it. And we love the film we made.” (Katharine Hepburn in Chandler, 83) LITTLE […]


Reading FROZEN (2013) as a Feminist

FROZEN (2013) is a great example of how Disney can unfold non-traditional plot lines without antagonizing traditionalists. The story is loosely, and I do mean loosely, based on Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Snow Queen” (1845). The seven stories of “The Snow Queen” constitute Andersen’s longest fairy tale about a boy and […]


Websites Worth Visiting

It’s been a busy couple of months, and I must apologize to my faithful followers (hello, Judy!) for not having written much since the massively successful TCM Summer Under the Stars Blogathon, for which I earned a Blu-Ray copy of WEST SIDE STORY (1961). Although I’ve been dreadfully remiss in […]


Five Roles Katharine Hepburn Never Played: The Great Imaginary Film Blogathon

We all indulge in a little wishful thinking at some times. “I wish political leaders wouldn’t use chemical weapons on their own people.” “I wish Congress would NOT shut down the entire US government.” “I wish Katharine Hepburn had made a film about Amelia Earhart.” You know, the really important […]


REMODELING HER HUSBAND (1920): A lost Gish sisters treasure

This post is written in conjunction with the Gish Sisters Blogathon hosted by The Motion Pictures and Movies, Silently. For my previous post about Dorothy and Lillian Gish, see Conservatism in Revolution: The Gish sisters in D. W. Griffith’s ORPHANS OF THE STORM (1921). For more about silent movies in general, […]


“Movies and the Battle of the Sexes” by ZetMec

This post was written in conjunction with the 2013 Summer Reading Classic Film Book Challenge hosted by Out of the Past. This is my second summer book review. A few months ago, “Movies and the Battle of the Sexes” showed up in my mailbox – a fellow-classic movie lover requested […]